Mujer de España (Movie Thoughts: Julieta)

JulietaI cannot say I always agree with and enjoy Pedro Almodovar’s work but I am always engaged by them, and that is more than I can say for a lot of filmmakers. He is always something in his stories, and his characters, mostly the women, are colorful both literally and figuratively. In his twentieth film, ‘Julieta,’ Almodovar gives us another one of his women – and this one ranks among the best of them. Julieta is fierce, strong, vulnerable, flawed, and very very real.

Julieta is played by two women in different times of her life. There’s the middle aged Julieta, played by Emma Suarez, and in the beginning we see her as someone pulled together, only to have a chance encounter rock her world. We go back decades later to a young Julieta, played by Adriana Ugarte, and this Julieta looks and acts like Madonna from the Papa Don’ Preach video. And then we see her life unravel before her eyes, and what a mad and fascinating story. She goes from being a teacher to living in a seaside town with a hunky fisherman, only to be drawn back to Madrid because of her daughter, who we find out as an adult has abandoned her mother. But how did we get to this point? The story Almodovar weaves is as colorful as the sets and wallpapers of the homes these characters inhibit. Suarez and Ugarte are both fantastic, but I was particularly drawn to the former, who gives the character a more subtle approach. I read that originally this character was supposed to have been played by Meryl Streep and as good as Suarez is, can you even imagine?

Almodovar based the story on three Alice Munro short stories, and he nailed the feel of her prose – a lot of what transpires is open ended but realized, and situations and characters will make you ponder about life, mortality, Catholic guilt. He likens love here to addiction and in these characters, and the observation has never more apt. I think this is one of his best work – one that is mature and self-assured, and truly one of the best films of last year.

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