Is It A Video (Music Thoughts: Call me By Your Name Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Call Me By Your NameThe one thing I loved most about ‘Call Me By Your Name’ is its music. I thought it not only enhanced the film, but it seems like it was another character. The music helped build tension, it emphasized how characters are feeling, and in some cases helped advance the story.

Since the movie is set in Northern Italy 1983, we get a glimpse of pop music then. I loved how Giorgio Morroder and Joe Esposito  ‘Lady Lady Lady’ described the emotional turmoil in Elio’s mind as he watched Oliver dance with another girl. I was racking my brain as to why that song sounded so familiar and voila, I googled and found out that it was on the ‘Flashdance’ soundtrack, which of course I used to play back in the day. And I am nowhere near an 80s pop music expert, but I don’t think I recall ever listening to Miss Cha Cha Cha’s ‘Paris Latino,’ and now it’s one of my favorite things.

Then there’s the classical stuff. I cannot stop listening to “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme,” which id of course from one of my favorite scenes from the movie, when Elio starts showing off to Oliver how he can change arrangements of a piece based on how Liszt would do Bach’s version, among other variants. On the soundtrack, Alessio Bax’s recording of the tune is perfection. I also love all the other ‘modern’ instrumental pieces, like Ryuichi Sakamoto’s ‘Germination.’

And really, we also get Sufjan Steven’s three songs, two that were made especially for the film. They are all magnificent, each and every single one of them. They all fit perfectly in each of the scenes, and even Luca Guadigno describes the songs as part of the narration of the film. There’s the urgency of ‘Fultiel Devices’ when Elio starts looking for Oliver after he has professed his love for him. And there’s the swooning, romantic ‘Mystery of Love,’ and I don’t think I will ever listen to ‘Vision of Gideon’ without shedding a tear.

‘Call Me By Your Name’ is rich in sensory artistry – the lush cinematography, the ripeness of the peach, the cracking of the soft-boiled egg. The music, evidenced in this soundtrack, contributes to what makes it unforgettable.

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