But Just For Me (Movie/Stage Thoughts: An American In Paris, London Cast, Dominion Theater)

AAIP_Playful_420x5881I am really loving this trend of Broadway productions being shown at movie theaters. Perhaps because I am no longer in New York City, and this gets me close to my beloved theaters. I saw a screening of ‘An American in Paris’ and quickly jumped to get a ticket. In this case, this is from the 2017 West End production which closed January 2018, with the same production team, and it even ‘imported’ the two principal actors: Robbie Fairchild and Leanne Cope (he from New York City Ballet, she from Royal Ballet Company)

I saw the Broadway production and fell in love with the show instantly.  I loved the direction and choreography of Christopher Wheedon, who seamlessly incorporated ballet into the show. Here the ballet is so prominent it is as if it was another character in the story. I thought Fairchild was so fantastic in the role and cannot imagine the show without him, so it’s great that the show is being ‘preserved’ like this with him on the role.

I cannot imagine the last time I had a smile on my face for a straight two hundred and fifty minutes. And my biggest takeaway from the production? That it is one of the most romantic shows I have seen in recent years. The show was beautifully shot – with closeups on intimate moments, and great aerial shots so we can fully appreciate the artistic fluidity of the dancing. And the Gershwin songs got to me, even if I have heard those  songs a million times. I kind of miss Max Von Essen and Brandon Uranowitz from the original Broadway cast, but David Seadon Young’s ‘But Not For Me’ is just as haunting.  The movie, and show, is a treat.

The Emotions of Baking (Stage Thoughts: The Cake, Audrey Skirball Kenis Theater)

1531166572_front_image_TheCake-206x270Now is the time of Trump, and now is the time when the Supreme Court has declared that a baker can discriminate against a same-sex couple, giving him the right to refuse to bake a cake for a gay wedding. I personally would not want someone like that to bake my cake anyway but I know that yes it just isn’t right – someone’s hate should not be celebrated, as Trump and the Republicans do. That is where I stand as I enter the Audrey Skirball Kenis Theater at the Geffen Playhouse to watch ‘The Cake,’ a play written by Bekah Brumstetter. I learned from her bio that Brumstetter writes for ‘This Is Us,’ and I am still unsure if that was a good or bad thing.

I liked ‘The Cake.’ It flips the famous Supreme Court Case by having a lesbian couple be rejected by a baker (played by Debra Jo Rupp)  I always say that these case become more ‘human’ when it starts to affect people you know, and that is exactly what happens here. The baker has known one of the brides she childhood, and is desperate to bake her that cake, so we see her internal struggle. But, she also follows the bible and her church, and they are telling her otherwise – that it is a sin to do it.  I can get pretty closed-minded on things, and this play has an appealing actress play someone I normally would not like. So I listen to the other side, and I disagree, and I try to understand her. The play makes the case for civility and common sense, something that is lacking in society nowadays more often than not. There are aspects of the play I disliked – why all the senseless nudity? – but I have to admit it opened my eyes very briefly in understanding ‘the other side.’

Take Me To The World (Stage Thoughts: The World Goes Round, Reprise 2.0 at The Freud Playhouse, UCLA)

CORRECT+PHONE+-+NO+DISCOUNT+SOCIAL+MEDIA+CARDOne of the things I miss most about living in New York is theater. To say there is less theater in LA is an understatement. You have to dig deep to find something here,  and what you get can be not necessarily worth it (I refuse to see touring companies, and yes I admit I am a snob) But once in a while, you do get something worth your while, and I found that in the Reprise 2 series production of Kander & Ebb’s ‘The World Goes ‘Round’ at the Freud Playhouse at UCLA.  I remember the Off-Broadway production well, at the Westside Theater in Midtown West, before all the gentrification there took place. Look at who was involved at the original production – Scott Ellis directing, Susan Stroman doing choreography, and look at the cast: Robert Cuccioli, Karen Ziemba, Karen Mason among others. It was a memorable evening.

I am a realist, and did not expect this cast to be as memorable. And to be frank, they aren’t. Dawnn Lewis (from the television show ‘A Different World’) and Valeri Perri (she was in the 2nd National Tour of Evia in the 80s)  are both fine, and the latter gets the showcase-y songs (‘Isn’t It Better’ from Funny Lady, ‘Colored Lights’ from The Rink) The rest of the cast is dependable enough, if at times forgettable: Larry Cedar, Kelly Dorney, and Michael Starr. Okay so maybe Starr’s is a bit more hard to forget after he plays a naked ‘Arthur’ in ‘Arthur In the Afternoon’ (his muscles are fine)

All in all, not a bad night of theater, f we go by Los Angeles standards. I am mostly marveling at the songs, as it is always nice to have these songs sung live. Richard Israel’s production skews more cabaret than musical theater (A lady next to me asked her companion – ‘are they just gonna sing’) but I’ll take what I can get, and this isn’t too bad.

My Fault, I Fear (Stage Thoughts: Side By Side By Sondheim, The Odyssey Theater Ensemble)

side-by-side-by-sondheimI would be the first to admit I am a theater snob. I am a big theater fan, of course, and since I used to be in new York I would see the best of the bests. I still have no time for touring companies (I always say these are the people not good enough to be on the boards) and there were times I would scoff at local productions. But fate has landed me in Los Angeles, and it’s Tinseltown here all day all night that there isn’t much of a theater scene. Still, there are some small gems to be found if you look hard enough. The Odyssey Theater Ensemble in West Los Angeles is doing a production of ‘Side By Side by Sondheim’ and it has piqued my interest. This is a piece that is not touched frequently, and the only thing I know of it is from an Original London Cast Recording. It’s a mostly chamber piece, and to be honest, it has been ages – decades – since I last listened to that cast recording. So my interest was certainly piqued, though of course I wasn’t expecting too much. I told myself, at the very least, I will be hearing Sondheim songs being sung, and that’s much better than Netflix and Chill (theoretically, of course)

That’s my fault, I fear. This is a small diamond production. It is not of the highest grade, but it does well with what it has got, and the production serves the brilliant material well. The cast of four (Rachel McLaughlan, Chris Kerrigan, Sarah Busic, and Mark Kaufman) sing on pitch, and on some numbers even shine on their interpretations. But I sense some greenness – Busic has a little tendency to oversell a song (such as in ‘Losing My Mind’) and McLaughlan has minor tics that distract (she winks at wrong moments) Kerrigan fares better mostly, and has a vocal range that can navigate the intricacy of Sondheim’s music. Kaufman has a lot less to do, essaying the narrator part, and is mostly unmemorable. All in all, they are competent, though, frankly, not top notch.

But that’s me being a showqueen bitch. This is a small production, and it provides enough joys for an evening, It’s better than an episode of ‘Queer Eye’ on Netflix on a random Saturday night, and in my book, that is good.

Not A Hard Knock Life (Stage Thoughts: Annie, The Hollywood Bowl)

30086_show_portrait_largeSeeing ‘Annie’ at The Hollywood Bowl last night was significant for me for a couple of reasons. First, ‘Annie’ was my very first Broadway show at age thirteen, so obviously it holds a special place in my heart. Second, this is my first time at The Hollywood Bowl, an iconic Los Angeles venue, on my six-month anniversary weekend since moving to Southern California. Plus, this show stars Lea Salonga as Grace Farrell, who I remember seeing playing the role of Annie when she was a young girl. So, essentially,  there’s all kinds of intertwined emotions here.

The nineteen piece orchestra (amplified to high heavens) sounded good, and the score sounds glorious in its hands. Kaylin Hedges is a wonderful Annie, with a voice of steel that the role requires (I read she was discovered via YouTube)  Call me an indulgent purist, though, but couldn’t her Annie have worn a curly red wig? That’s a major directorial choice I had a problem with. The rest of the cast worked well, with David Alan Grier a serviceable Daddy Warbucks, and Salonga more than fine Farrell (I wonder if the latter’s mid-century British/New Yawk accent was a directorial choice, though) Ana Gasteyer’s Miss Hannigan was more funny than menacing and that works for me. (I still get nightmares from  Nell Carter’s scary Hannigan from the 1997 revival) But the best performances for me were Roger Bart’s Rooster and Megan Hilty’s Lily St. Regis, both stealing all the scenes they were in. And adorable Malea Emma Tjandrawidjaja captured the audience’s hearts as Molly. I love the diversity of the cast, representing the colorful landscape of now. Director Michael Arden manages to not have the venue dwarf the performances, and the book scenes never overstay their welcome.  He really doesn’t do any earth-shattering change in this production, which is most of the times all you need. (cc: James Lapine’s dark humourless take from 2014)

Surely, this is not my most ideal way of seeing this show, but as an experience, I would say this is one satisfied me at that particular moment of my life. A perfect breezy summer evening and overflowing wine contributed to the magical experience.  I went with my three best friends (we have all known each other since we were nine) and the whole time I was there, I kept on telling myself, ‘Life is good,’ because, truly, at times, it is.

The Voice (Stage Thoughts: Audra McDonald Live at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion 5/20/18)

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I have seen Audra McDonald in most of her Tony-winning performances but it is always a treat to just see Audra McDonald, the living legend. On Sunday at Los Angeles’ Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, she proved that she has one of the best voices singing anywhere nowadays (Stephen Sondheim said as much and as we all know, he is God)  and I think we can be assured that her recordings have not been ‘sweetened’ because her voice is just as luminous, expressive, and crystal clear live.

Her show mirrors, almost to the song, the repertoire from her latest live album, ‘Sing Happy’ And if, like me, you have been listening to the album since it came out, then the show may sound just a little familiar. But who cares, hearing her sing ‘It’s Lovely Up Here’ is glorious in any way possible. Plus, I think she has a great sparkling personality – funny, touching, down-to-earth that all in all, it doesn’t matter – you will feel like you have reached heaven just by having both of you breath the same air. The great theater repertoire is unmatched, starting with her ‘I Am What I Am,’ from La Cage Aux Folles. In some ways, this song feels more like a personal anthem of me loving theater music, unapologetically. Another particular highlight for me is ‘The Facebook Song,’ which I have not really heard prior to her recording it, and has now become one of my favorite tracks from the album. At Sunday’s performance, it was a highlight. McDonald’s voice may be highbrow, but works just as well screaming the F word. By the end of the concert, as she sings ‘Over The Rainbow,’ I was in a puddle of grateful tears. This is truly one of those days that I felt blessed to be alive, and able to experience the thrill of listening to live music. This show is an afternoon is something I will not soon forget.

Stephie From The Block (Television/Stage Thoughts: Stephanie J Block Live From Lincoln Center)

 

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I love theater. I love theater music, I love theater performers – the belters, the Ethel Mermans. So it’s no surprise that I loved ‘Stephanie J Block Live at Lincoln Center.’ This episode, taped last Dec 22, showcases one of the best voices on Broadway these days (she will be playing Cher in ‘The Cher Show’ opening soon on the boards) and this shows off her wonderful belting voice. I once saw her on a touring production of ‘Anything Goes,’ on the same production where Sutton Foster won a Tony, and the great thing about Block in that production was that I forgot about Foster’s performance, because Block made the role her own. Here, in this concert, she sings ‘Defying Gravity, and gosh darn you will ask ‘Idina who’ after hearing her version. I am not saying her version is better than Idina’s but you will definitely her version is different – and works just as well. And the thing I really appreciate in this show is how I saw a different side of Block – she has a sparkling sassy personality that you will want to just embrace. No wonder she is such a beloved figure in the theater community. For me, my two favorite numbers of hers here are the most personal ones for her  – when she sings about her husband in a medlette of ‘My Man/The Music That Makes me Dance,’ and when her husband, Sebastian Arcelus, duets with her with the gender-bending version of ‘Move On.’  This show made me miss New York.