A Date To Remember (Short Film Thoughts: The One You Never Forget)

1MV5BMmU4OGY4NjMtYzMyNC00Zjg4LWE4ZTctNDJiZDExMTFiZmY0XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTIwNjU1NjU@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,679,1000_AL_Sometimes all it takes is eight minutes for an ugly cry.  For some odd reason, this short film showed up on my Facebook page (targeted marketing?) and all the comments were glowing and positive. So I thought to myself, eight minutes watching it will probably not kill me. Well, it kid of did. It killed my heart right that very second and it ripped it to shreds and before I knew it, there I am in the middle of mu living room in tears. Basically, it’s about a young boy going to the prom, and his parents are all excited for him. The mom wants some info and has been pestering the young boy but he is tight-lipped. When the date arrives later on, it is only his father who is there, but the boy rushes to go to the car as he didn’t want to have his date come in. When the father looks out, he sees his son is with another boy. What happens next is heartwarming and so very cute. I am heartened to find these kinds of movies exist, as durign my days the thought of this would send everyone reeling. But, progress can still make good art, and this one I will cherish…

New York City Summer Love (Movie Thoughts: Adam)

EBk3tgKVAAAkqq8I didn’t realize that ‘Adam’ was such a controversial movie. I didn’t even think its themes are very controversial. Directed by Rhys Ernst (who himself is a trans man) this is a story of Adam, who stays with his lesbian sister (Margaret Qually) in New York City for the summer, and gets drawn into the lesbian/trans men scene. He meets a young woman, Gillian, who he instantly falls for, but she thinks he is a trans man, and he goes along with the lie. Taking the politics out of the film, I think it’s your standard coming-of-age tale about someone finding himself in the world and hopefully learning a lesson or two. In that sense, I thought the movie was very sweet. Numerous films have been made about this, involving mistaken identities, lies not being corrected, and above all, stupid things we do for love. Is the film harmful for trans people? I don’t exactly know if it is – I saw mostly human characters here, all flawed like the rest of the world, cis or trans. This was a mostly entertaining film, and that’s all I can take away from the film.

Before Barcelona(Film Thoughts: End of the Century)

MV5BODVhNzAwODYtZTQzZi00YmJmLTllMzMtODA1Nzg4MTAyYjc5XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTg5MDEyNw@@._V1_Intimacy, when captured on film, is a glorious thing. It’s somewhat indescribable, as it is more felt.  Lucio Castro captures it perfectly in ‘End Of The Century,’ and here I am, days after seeing it, and I can still feel things from it. Set in Barcelona (that alone scores points for me) Javi (Ramon Pujol) and Ocho (Juan Barberini) first see each other on the beach, but they don’t really connect until later when Ocho sees him by the balcony of his Air BnB, calling him out by the graphic on his shirt, ‘Kiss.’ (That graphic would prove to be significant later on)  He asks him to come up to his room, and they kiss passionately. There’s a tenderness and urgency at the same time in their kiss, and afterwards while sharing some wine and cheese on a rooftop, they discover that they have met each other before – and we see them decades earlier in their younger years, on that time they first met. I instantly connect with both of them, and maybe it’s the romantic in me, but these things always resonate – ships that pass each other, haring fleeting moments. You never know if you will ever meet them again, and as you separate and reflect on what you have, you discover a real ache in your heart. In some weird sense, you feel the same thing as you watch Castro’s film:: for some brief moment you witness two souls touch each other, and you also feel an ache. Some people have described this as similar to Richard Linklaer’s ‘Before’ series and it is an apt comparison. I often wonder if Javi and Ocho would ever connect again, and not knowing makes it more painful, but at the same time all the better.

Forbidden Love: Africa and Asia (Film Thoughts: Rafiki/Lan Yu)

rafiki-136713The love that dare not speak its name: this theme depicting homosexuality in movies used to be the norm, but in this day and age, is it still relevant? I thino f that even as I see two movies back to back exploring that very theme.

First is ‘Rafiki,’ directed by Wanuri Kahiu. This film was the first Kenyan film to be screened at the Cannes Film Festival, and it comes with a bit of controversy, as it has previously been banned in its home country, and the battle even went up to their Supreme Court, with the court overthrowing the ban. (It finally was screened in theaters to sold out audiences)  The film presents a simple love story, as two daughters of competing politicians fall in love. The conflicts are layered – they battle homophobia and then the familial entanglements. It’s a bit too melodramatic at times, but the performances by Samantha Mugatsia and Sheila Munyiva as the star-crossed lovers really elevate this. It captured my heart and melted it.

lanyuStanley Kwan’s ‘Lan Yu’ also did, though it is a less successful film.  From 2001, this film depicts a relationship between a successful businessman and a country boy. In its synopsis, the film boasts that it is a story from the 80s amidst the back drop of the rallies from Tiannamen Square. And though they vaguely reference it, we don’t really see it. Hu Jun plays an assumed corrupt businessman who pays for his involvements afterwards, and there’s enough conflict there, so the sad ending felt tacked on and unwarranted. Still, I cared about the characters enough to be touched by the film.

Christmas Cocktail (Film Thoughts: Cola de Mono)

MV5BNWNhMGJhNTAtN2NhZi00NzRlLTkwMWItOWZlZWE4ZjcxZDZhXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMzcyODUxOQ@@._V1_‘Cola de Mono’ is set at Christmastime, but it’s really not your typical Hallmark Christmas movie. It’s a little bit dark and very very gay.  The title is based on a drink that Chileans prepare for the Holidays, and the term is also a gay slur. The film is a about a set of brothers who both come to terms with their sexuality on Christmas Eve. The theme is on the dark side, and even though I had read the film labeled as a thriller, I was very surprised by the turn if events towards the latter part of the film. It is also quite explicit, and director Alberto Fuguet definitely has a very specific point of view that he slaps into the film. I thought it was a very interesting film, even if I really did not enjoy it in the sense that it wasn’t a feel-good kind of film. It’s a little offfbeat for the Christmas season, but offbeat doesn’t necessarily mean bad.

Say Goodbye (Film Thoughts: 1985)

large_1985-poster (1)Oh God, do I know 1985 pretty well, a year where I learned a lot of life lessons, so I look at that year with mixed feelings. It was a tough, but I came out stronger from it. I look back and think that this was more than thirty years ago, and the world was different then. Director Yen Tan captures that year perfectly in ‘1985,’ one of those small movies that we used to get a lot more. It’s shot in black and white 116 mm, and the way it looks and sounds adds to its storytelling.

Adrian (Cory Michael Smith) goes home to Texas for Christmas. He has been living in New York City and has not been back in three years. He has a younger brother, Andrew, who seems wary of him. There’s a lot of ‘unspokens’ here. His parents probably know he is gay but won’t talk about it. Furthermore,  Andrew is becoming a Madonna fan, and is now interested in theater (he wants to see the movie version of ‘A chorus Line’!) so we all know where that trajectory is going. Most significantly, Adrian’s lover has just passed from AIDS, and it looks like Adrian has it, too, and this trip home may be a way for him to say goodbye to his family – he maxed his card out to buy them expensive gifts. There’s an element of internal heartbreak here, and the actors are all subtle and effective, with Smith leading the way. I was taken by Virginia Madsen who plays his mother. As a mother of a gay man, she is torn between her husband, and her love for her son, and communicates her feelings both sides effectively. The screenplay is spot-on, showing then-topical references accurately. I was very touched by this film, and easily identified with the character of Adrian, who could easily be me at that time (he’s just a little older than me)  Gay guys of a certain age now (my generation) would like this film and I hope they find it.

Footballers In Love (Movie Thoughts: Mario)

0maInitially reading the synopsis of ‘Mario’ made me think that this movie,  directed by Marcel Gisler what was going to be sport-centric. But I was wrong, and I was glad that this is more a straight-up (yes, pun intended) love story between two Football teammates. And I am glad to note that it is quite touching and heartbreaking, as we see them try to fight the obstacles of falling in the still-conservative environment of European football. This one is set in Swiss-German and it was great to see that setting, one I am a little unfamiliar with. The actors, Max Hubacher and Aaron Altaras were both very effective and you can feel the character’s affection for each other. I like the tenderness that was shown in the backdrop of the rough and gruff world of football, and I couldn’t help but tear up at the bittersweet ending. I liked this movie much more than I thought I would.