Odd Smells (Perfume Thoughts: Commodity Rain/Commodity Mimosa)

rainOh, this Commodity perfume line. It sure is interesting, but I can’t remember when I sampled two scents in a row that underwhelmed me.

And there is one, ‘Rain,’ that I truly detested. This is purportedly an aquatic fragrance, and they even describe it as ‘rain in a tropical forest.’ Well, the first blast for me was so unappealing – it was so sharp and pungent. The notes listing say bergamot and verbena but this is more cement. Actually, the Alaia fragrance had a similar description, but that was done beautifully. This is an awkward mess of a scent. Scrubber! The drydown is a bit better – the tropical flowers do come out, but they are of the synthetic kind. Still a pass.

375x500.50620On my other wrist is Commodity Mimosa. This is a floral citrus, and is supposed to be the mimosa flower. And sure, I do get that on the top notes. But as the scent developed, it turns soapy. I went to my friend and said, ‘doesn’t this smell like Dial soap to you,’ and she agreed. Well, at least the color is in the same family. While inoffensive, I think Mimosa is, again, weird.

This made me think about weird vs. quirky. For example, I associate a lot of Etat Libre d’Orange as weird scents, but weird in an amusing and fun kind of way. These two scents from Commodity are just plain odd. Like ‘head-scratching odd.

 

No Honeysuckle For Me (Perfume Thoughts: Nectar, Commodity)

375x500.50615I have a Fragrance Friend at work (we spray each other what we are wearing everyday) and she sprayed me her new obsession: Commodity Nectar.  Actually, she has been talking about the Commodity line for a while now, and I confess I do not know much about it. I know it is very popular in the fragrance community, and I am sure an older version of me would be as obsessed. She gave me her wrist and I smelled something divine – floral and sweet, and ‘lived in.’  She says it’s honeysuckle, and I blurted yes, and I love that note in perfume, which I don’t see a lot of.

And then she sprayed on my skin. The initial blast was pure cologne on my skin – a citrus blend of bergamot and tangerine (sorry, Italian tangerine, as per the list of notes) I think I get some orange blossom as well, and I love anything orange blossom so that was a great welcome. And the weirdest thing – no honeysuckle on my skin, just that citrus cologne mixture. Okay, maybe a slight hint of it, but nowhere near what I smelled on my friend.

Update: An hour in, still no sign of that honeysuckle.

Cherries In My Rose (Perfume Thoughts: Dancing Roses, Viktor & Rolf Magic Collection)

375x500.42763With Mother’s Day coming up, I thought I would break my sample of ‘Dancing Roses’ by Viktor and Rolf.  My mom loved roses, and whenever I try to remember her, I would do so by wearing rose scents as those were her favorites to wear. I have had this sample for a while now. but have been reticent to try because I remember it being pricey. It is from V & R’s ‘Magic’ collection, which is their ‘high-end’ niche-type line. (I am sure it was to ride the coat tails of their hugely successful Flowerbomb) But it looks like they have lowered the price point? Saks has this now for $145 for a 2.5 oz, which seems to be the same price as Flowerbomb.

Oh, the scent? I like it a lot. The opening is a blast of cherry-rose, but with heaps more cherry than the watery rose. There is a lychee note which makes this very fruity, but there’s a boozy note here (brandy?) that makes this more adult-smelling. And the notes say there is saffron but I only faintly get that. Actually, this feels very weak over all. I spritzed almost the whole thing and I can barely smell it, and there is almost no sillage. If you like like Tom Ford’s Lost Cherry, this is a cheaper and more transparent-smelling alternative, and for warmer weather might be better as it is less syrupy. I should really get a new sample and try it again now – i wonder if with this new price point, it has been reformulated.

Diptyque Drakkar (Perfume Thoughts: Eau de Minthe, Diptyque)

375x500.54387I have been fascinated with perfume since I was a teenager in the 80s, and of course, I didn’t know then what I knew now – I was wearing a lot of the fougeres from the Men’s Department – your Aramis, your Drakkar Noir. To this day, when I smell those scents, I get instantly brought back to the me of those days, though I really do nto have any of those scents (I’d kill for vintage Aramis, though)

Diptyque’s new ‘Eau de Minthe’ reminds me of those perfumes, and right now I don’t knwo if that is a good or bad thing. I am wearing it now, and it wears like a classic fougere – herbaceous and aromatic. I smell the greenery right away, with that mint on top (and patchouli in the background) and amber woody heart that is not uncommon with a lot of men’s colognes. This is the second wearing for me and I am surprised I like it much better than the first time I wore it (My Uber driver gave me compliment as soon as I got in his car) but I don’t know – am I warming up to this because I haven’t really worn anything similar in a while? It also seems so un-Diptyque. It skews quite masculine, though I would say the quality is there (massive sillage, wort-it longevity)  So two wearings in, I am still kind of resisting it, though my nose says go for it. Fraghead problems, I know.

Frozen Jasmine (Perfume Thoughts: Sundazed, Byredo)

375x500.54747Summer’s almost here and if you are still feeling the May and June glooms, rest assured Byredo will speed things up a bit. Their new release ‘Sundazed’ is summer in a bottle.

It’s a nice lemon burst int he beginning with splashes of mandarin, so it’s a nice citrus blast. In it’s heart is a mixture of jasmine and neroli. Then a ‘cotton candy’ note comes in and wraps the whole perfume in a candied haze. I described it to someone as candied neroli.

Essentially, it’s a cologne. But to give it more heft, there’s that jasmine and neroli center,  and that candied accord. Imagine Prada Candy but instead of caramel, you get a citrus floral. When I first tried this, I thought it was just another variation of a cologne. It makes sense that Byredo would be doing their own version of the immensely popular Neroli Portofino by Tom Ford. But when I wore it for a full day (I always suggest this when youa re trying a new scent) I liked it a lot more – the cotton candy accord here smells icy, akin to a frozen lemon popsicle. The floral heart gives it elegance, making this not your typical frothy teenaged perfume. Lord help me, I think I want this for the summer.

Flower In Your Patchouli (Perfume Thoughts: Lubin and Patchouli, Jo Malone)

375x500.53543Jo Malone’s ‘Lupin and Patchouli’ is part of their Wild Flower and Weeds Collection. I had to look up what a lupin flower looks like.  It’s those violet ferny looking things that a lot of people use more in an ornamental way. I didn’t realize it had a scent, or are Yann Vasnier and Louise Turner just using it also ‘ornamentally’ in here?

What I do smell is a floral bouquet in the first spritz, a rose, peony and mandarin orange blend. And then the patchouli comes in – but a refined kind, not the granola hippie kind (this is Jo Malone after all)  It all comes down nice and smooth, and admittedly well blended, but for me, a bit on the boring side. I keep on looking for a there here, and then I wonder why. If you’re in search for a nice pleasant floral patchouli, this could fit the bill, but it won’t be any more. (Sillage and production is good, on the office friendly side)

Gorgeous Green (Perfume Thoughts: Roasted Green Tea, J-Scent)

375x500.43733I was at Luckyscent in search of when this new (to me) line caught my eye – J Scent. I joked, ‘is this perfume for Jewish people?’ but then I realized the J stands for Japan.

This is from their website:

” J-Scent perfumes are created with the theme of traditional Japanese fragrances.
This brand of perfume selects traditionally Japanese scents and carefully blends them together. Enjoy “Japanese scents” that embody the beauty of Japan and represent its four seasons.”

But then this also caught my eye:

“Not mixing. Blending. In harmony with nature.
It’s not splashing on a perfume to stand out, but wearing the fragrance as part of your daily life.
Naturally. As part of you. This fragrance becomes one with nature, one with your life.”

Okay, they are perhaps a little dramatic in their copy, but I get it as part of the Japanese aesthetic.  I was immediately drawn to ‘Roasted Green Tea’ because tea scents always get to me. I sprayed and it was love at first sniff. The first whiff i slightly smoky from the effect of roasting Hojicha tea, but then the slightly sweet and bitter tea accord instantly broke my heart – there’s a certain melancholy feeling here, but it is also sweet, and the floral jasmine heart just gives it ephemeral beauty. The whole thing smells like an artisan ice cream flavor, akin to a Japanese desert. It’s fruity floral, but a specifically exotic one. And the delicious nutty note (I get pistachio) just rounds up the whole thing perfectly.

To be honest, though, the perfume is on the faint side. And it’s appealing price point ($80 for a 50 ml) shows through its very alcohol-ish blast int he beginning. The projection is on the weaker side as well, but I kind of get that. I doubt if the Japanese aesthetic is on the loud side.

But still, love conquers all. I bought a bottle.